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Statewide Grievance Committee
Statewide Bar Counsel

Multi-jurisdictional Practice FAQs

  1. What is the multi-jurisdictional practice notification process?
  2. What types of matters require compliance with Rule 5.5(f)?
  3. What are some common examples of matters for which a non-admitted lawyer must comply with Rule 5.5(f)?
  4. What is the fee for a notification pursuant to Rule 5.5(f)?
  5. How does a non-admitted lawyer provide the notification and payment required by Rule 5.5(f)?
  6. What constitutes a “separate matter” for which a new notification is required under Rule 5.5(f)?
  7. What constitutes providing legal services in this jurisdiction?
  8. What happens if a lawyer subject to Rule 5.5(f) does not provide the requisite notification and fee?
  9. Are there situations in which I cannot use Rule 5.5(f)’s MJP notification process to provide legal services in Connecticut?
  10. How will I know that my MJP notification has been rejected?
  11. As a Connecticut attorney, can I verify that an out-of-state lawyer has complied with this rule?

1. What is the multi-jurisdictional practice notification process?
Rule 5.5(f) of the Rules of Professional Conduct requires non-admitted lawyers who wish to appear in this state to provide legal services in certain matters to give notice to the statewide bar counsel prior to and at the conclusion of the representation and to pay a fee.

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2. What types of matters require compliance with Rule 5.5(f)?
Non-admitted lawyers must comply with subsection (f) for “each separate matter” that the lawyer seeks to provide legal services in this state, when those legal services fall within subsection (c)(3) and (c)(4) of Rule 5.5.

Rule 5.5(c) provides:

(c) A lawyer admitted in another United States jurisdiction which accords similar privileges to Connecticut lawyers in its jurisdiction, and provided that the lawyer is not disbarred or suspended from practice in any jurisdiction, may provide legal services on a temporary basis in this jurisdiction that:

(1) are undertaken in association with a lawyer who is admitted to practice in this jurisdiction and who actively participates in the matter;

(2) are in or reasonably related to a pending or potential proceeding before a tribunal in this or another jurisdiction, if the lawyer, or a person the lawyer is assisting, is authorized by law or order to appear in such proceeding or reasonably expects to be so authorized;

(3) are in or reasonably related to a pending or potential mediation or other alternative dispute resolution proceeding in this or another jurisdiction, with respect to a matter that is substantially related to, or arises in, a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice and are not services for which the forum requires pro hac vice admission; or

(4) are not within subsections (c)(2) or (c)(3) and arise out of or are substantially related to the legal services provided to an existing client of the lawyer’s practice in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice.

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3. What are some common examples of matters for which a non-admitted lawyer must comply with Rule 5.5(f)?
No list in this area could be exhaustive, but some common examples are:

  • Appearing in Connecticut to perform a real estate or business closing and related duties.
  • Appearing in Connecticut for depositions and other discovery related matters related to litigation pending in another jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice.
  • Appearing in Connecticut for a mediation or arbitration related to litigation pending in another jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice.
  • Appearing in Connecticut for a legal meeting with an existing or potential client

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4. What is the fee for a notification pursuant to Rule 5.5(f)?
The State of Connecticut Judicial Branch has established a fee of $100 per notification.

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5. How does a non-admitted lawyer provide the notification and payment required by Rule 5.5(f)?
The notification and payment required by Rule 5.5(f) must be done online through the Statewide Grievance Committee here. No other forms of notification and payment (e.g. mail, fax, courier, etc.) will constitute compliance with this rule.

For first time users only:

1. Select the “Enroll” option and provide the required information then select “Continue.” You will need to remember your email address and password to log into the system in the future, including the notification that is required at the end of the representation.

For all enrolled users:

1. After logging in, provide the information in the “Enter New Notification” screen and then select “Continue.”

2. Verify that the information for the notification is correct and select “Modify” to make any changes. Otherwise select “Submit and Pay by Credit Card” to pay the $100 notification fee.

3. Pay the required fee by Master Card or Visa. Select “Process Payment” to pay the fee.

4. At the end of the representation, log back into the system and select “edit” to provide the “Representation End Date.” Check the certification box, then select “Update” to complete the process.

5. Provide a new notification and pay an additional fee for each separate matter.

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6. What constitutes a “separate matter” for which a new notification is required under Rule 5.5(f)?
Non-admitted lawyers subject to Rule 5.5(f) must provide a new notification and pay a fee for each separate matter that falls within Rule 5.5(c)(3) and (c)(4). Examples of when a new notification and fee must be provided and when it is not include, but are not limited to:

a. A title search, client meeting and closing in a single real property transaction. This is one matter for which one notification and payment only must be made even if the parts to the transaction occur over multiple days.

b. A deposition or series of depositions over a series of known days related to litigation pending in another jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice. This is one matter for which one notification and payment only must be made.

c. Legal meetings with an existing client on one or multiple days regarding multiple files. These are separate matters for which separate notifications and payments must be made.

d. Multiple attorneys appearing for an existing client in a single matter. Each attorney must provide a separate notification and payment.

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7. What constitutes providing legal services in this jurisdiction?
The practice of law in Connecticut is defined by Section 2-44A of the Connecticut Practice Book. To the extent that a non-admitted lawyer is practicing law in this jurisdiction as defined by Section 2-44A, the non-admitted lawyer need not be physically present in Connecticut to come within the requirements of Rule 5.5(f).

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8. What happens if a lawyer subject to Rule 5.5(f) does not provide the requisite notification and fee?
Rule 8.5 of Connecticut’s Rules of Professional Conduct extends disciplinary jurisdiction over non-admitted lawyers who provide legal services in Connecticut. Specifically, Rule 8.5(a) provides, among other things,

[a] lawyer not admitted in this jurisdiction is also subject to the disciplinary authority of this jurisdiction if the lawyer provides or offers to provide any legal services in this jurisdiction. A lawyer may be subject to the disciplinary authority of both this jurisdiction and another jurisdiction for the same conduct.
Accordingly, if a non-admitted lawyer provides legal services in Connecticut that are contemplated by Rule 5.5(c)(3) and (c)(4) and fails to provide the notice and payment required by Rule 5.5(f), the lawyer is subject to discipline.

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9. Are there situations in which I cannot use Rule 5.5(f)’s MJP notification process to provide legal services in Connecticut?
Yes. The MJP notification process set forth in Rule 5.5(f) is limited to matters that:

(3) are in or reasonably related to a pending or potential mediation or other alternative dispute resolution proceeding in this or another jurisdiction, with respect to a matter that is substantially related to, or arises in, a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice and are not services for which the forum requires pro hac vice admission; or

(4) are not within subdivisions (c) (2) or (c) (3) and arise out of or are substantially related to the legal services provided to an existing client of the lawyer’s practice in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice.

Rule 5.5(c)(3) and (4) of the Rules of Professional Conduct (2008).

Some common examples when your MJP notification would be rejected are:

  • The jurisdiction in which your matter arises does not have accord Connecticut lawyers similar privileges. Please see Notice Regarding Jurisdictions That Accord Similar MJP Privileges to Connecticut Attorneys.
  • The matter involves an appearance before a tribunal in which pro hac vice status is required pursuant to Section 2-16 of the Connecticut Practice Book.
  • Your client resides in Connecticut and you are not working with a Connecticut attorney on the matter. (NB: If you are assisting a Connecticut attorney on a legal matter pursuant to Rule 5.5(c)(1), you do not need to file an MJP notification.)
  • The legal services you wish to provide in Connecticut are not temporary.

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10. How will I know that my MJP notification has been rejected?
You will be sent written notice of the rejection by the Statewide Grievance Committee with instructions on how to request a refund of the MJP notification fee.

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11. As a Connecticut attorney, can I verify that an out-of-state lawyer has complied with this rule?
Yes. Contact us at statewide.grievance@jud.ct.gov and we can verify the filing. Connecticut attorneys are in the best position to promote compliance with this rule.

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